It has taken a year and a half for the volunteers of the fine arts workshop at the Fundación Sophia to be able to reproduce the Pharaoh’s throne with fidelity, it will be one of the principal items of the itinerant exhibition "The Treasures of Tutankhamun", which was inaugurated this week in the Planetarium of Castellón.  Photo Diana Hirsch - Fundación Sophia.

The Throne of Tutankhamun recreated in Palma de Mallorca

It has taken a year and a half for the volunteers of the fine arts workshop at Fundación Sophia to be able to reproduce  the Pharaoh’s throne with fidelity, which will be one of the main items of the travelling exhibition “The Treasures of Tutankhamun,” which recently opened in the Planetarium of Castellón in Valencia.

“We have taken our time in the realization of this piece, because it is a true work of art,” says Monica Gutiérrez, responsible for the fine arts workshop at Fundación Sophia and curator of the exhibition. “There has been a process of research before implementation, as is the case in each of the hand crafted pieces in this collection,” she added.

This exhibit is made up of a selection of 44 reproductions, inspired by the originals that are exhibited in the Cairo Museum in Egypt. The pieces have been produced with the artistic advice and documentation of specialised institutions, such as the Graffith Institute or the British Museum in the United Kingdom and by Spanish Egyptologists.

The original throne of Tutankhamun is made of decorated wood with gold leaf, silver, glass and semiprecious stones such as lapis lazuli and measures 53 cm width x 65 deep and 104 high. It is currently one of the most attractive pieces in the Cairo Museum, and is part of the funerary treasures discovered by the English Egyptologist Howard Carter on 4 November 1922.

Mónica GutiérrezMonica Gutiérrez, curator of the exposition and responsible for the Fine Arts department at the Fundación Sophia, gives the finishing touches of gold leaf to the wooden frame of Tutankhamun’s throne.  Photo Diana Hirsch – Fundación Sophia.

The reproduction created in Palma de Mallorca has the same dimensions and has been made of wood, it is also decorated with gold and silver leaf, faithfully representing the original details. The glass and semiprecious stones have been reproduced with various materials skilfully applied to get as close to reality as possible.

“The most difficult part of this project has been to stick as close as possible to the original and I believe that we have achieved this,” says Monica Gutierrez. “The process has been enriching for all of us who have collaborated in its realization, as well as cultivating art through its application, we delve into the world view of this civilization in order to understand the symbolism behind each piece,” she added.

The king’s throne is part of the travelling exhibition The Treasures of Tutankhamun”  (www.exposicionesdidacticas.com), that is exhibited in museums and cultural centres throughout Spain. It will be on view in the Planetarium of Castellón until 30 August.

Sergio G. García

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